People

Dr. Corinne E. Packard

Associate Professor

Email: cpackard@mines.edu

Dr. Packard is an Associate Professor in the George S. Ansell Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department at the Colorado School of Mines and holds a joint appointment at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in the National Center for Photovoltaics. Prior to appointment at Mines, Packard earned her Ph.D. in Materials Science & Engineering from MIT. Her research program applies experimental techniques commonly used to characterize mechanical behavior and properties in structural materials to solve problems in ceramics in predominantly energy-related applications. She has focused on elucidating the principles and mechanisms of deformation behavior in ceramics at the micro- and nano-scales. In 2014, she received a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award and was selected as a TMS Young Leader. In 2017, she received the AIME Robert Lansing Hardy Award. To date, she has more than 30 archival publications, 3 issued patents, and has given over 40 invited and contributed talks.

 

Current Members

TOF-SIMS Manager

Michael Walker
TOF-SIMS Manager

Email: mawalker@mines.edu

Coming to Mines with nearly 20 years of experience in the Semiconductor industry, Michael joined Dr. Packard’s group as a TOF-SIMS specialist tasked with running and maintaining Mines’ brand new ION-TOF 5 instrument to assist students with their research projects.  Michael has worked at Motorola, Texas Instruments and Samsung Austin Semiconductor in such areas as Diffusion, Failure Analysis, Yield Enhancement, Research and Development and, most recently, eight years in the Surface Analysis field utilizing TOF-SIMS, MS-SIMS, XPS, AES, and AFM to support the manufacturing of integrated circuits. In addition to his work in the field of technology, Michael also enjoys exploring his creative side.  He is a published fiction writer and has experience in the video and film industry as a Writer, Producer, Director, Assistant Director, Editor, Script Supervisor, Cameraman, and Production Assistant.  He also enjoys spending his free time at home making all kinds of fun things with his two 3D printers, laser etcher, and CNC wood carver.

Post Docs

George Burton
Post Doc

Email: gburton@mymail.mines.edu

George joined the Packard group as a postdoctoral fellow in January 2020. In collaboration with NREL, his research uses TEM to investigate ordering, structural defects and compositional intermixing in HVPE-grown GaAs/InGaP devices. He received his PhD in Materials Science at the Colorado School of Mines studying composition-property relationships of grain boundaries in ion-conducting ceramics as a CoorsTek Fellow. After obtaining his B.S. in Physics from Georgetown University, he spent one year measuring the properties of non-spherical colloid suspensions at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

Jie Chen
Post Doc

Email: chenjie@mines.edu

Jie joined the Packard group as a postdoctoral fellow in December 2019. His current research focuses on high-quality wafer-scale controlled spalling of III-V semiconductor materials and solar cells in collaboration with NREL. He received a PhD degree in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Houston and won the best dissertation award, with a background in III-Nitride thin films deposition, characterization, and fabrication of piezoelectric, electronic and optoelectronic devices. He received a M.S. degree in Materials Engineering from Chinese Academy of Sciences, with a background in fabrication and joining of ceramic matrix composites. He received a B.S. degree in Materials Physics from Yunnan University, with a background in synthesis of zinc oxide semiconductor materials.

Graduate Students

Anna Braun
PhD Student

Email: akbraun@mymail.mines.edu

Anna is a NSF Graduate Research Fellow working toward her PhD in Materials Science. Her project is focused on developing a release layer for gallium arsenide solar cells that would allow reuse of the substrate used for growth. The release layer will have poor adhesion to the substrate, but allow growth of high-quality solar cell material on top, and the poor adhesion of the release layer will allow removal of the solar cell via mechanical spalling. Substrate reuse would substantially decrease the high costs associated with III-V solar cell production. Anna graduated with a B.S. in Chemical Engineering and Chemistry from the Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in May 2019. She has previous research experience with perovskite materials and growth of gallium arsenide via hydride vapor-phase epitaxy.

Jason Chenenko
Masters Student

Email: chenenko@mines.edu

Jason is Master’s student in the Materials Science program. His research is a joint effort between Colorado School of Mines and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, focused on spalling fracture of single-crystal semiconductors for high efficiency solar cells. III-V semiconductor materials used in solar cells produce a large amount of waste due to the rough fracture surface of the substrate. Using mechanical spalling, a thin wafer can be cleaved from the substrate leaving a smooth fracture surface, allowing the substrate to be reused and greatly reducing the amount of waste produced during manufacturing of III-V solar cells. Jason is the Materials Science Department Representative in the Graduate Student Government and serves on the annual Graduate Research and Discovery Symposium (GRADS) planning committee. He graduated with a B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering from Alfred University in December 2018. He has prior research experience in a variety of fields including refractory ceramics, low-temperature flow glasses, ceramic-matrix composites, and metal-oxide nanosheets.

Jai Sharma
PhD Student

Email: jsharma@mymail.mines.edu

Jai is working towards his PhD in the Materials Science Program. He is investigating the kinetics of pressure-induced phase transformations in rare earth orthophosphates. These materials can exhibit transformation plasticity, ferroelasticity, and resistance to thermal and chemical degradation. Applications include oxide-oxide ceramic matrix composites in which rare earth orthophosphate fiber coatings improve performance. Jai is also conducting STEM outreach by developing kinetics teaching modules for children with dyslexia. He graduated with a B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in May 2019. Jai has prior experience in solvothermal synthesis and x-ray diffraction.

Sarah Sortedahl
PhD Student

Email: sortedahl@mymail.mines.edu

Sarah is a CoorsTek Fellow working toward her PhD in the Materials Science program. Her research focuses on understanding the mechanical performance of alumina made through lithography-based additive manufacturing. This study will establish design guidelines aiding users in maximizing the mechanical performance of parts formed through this method. Sarah is involved with the Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics (CCAC) where she is a lab manager and student organizer for the annual CCAC student conference. In May 2017, Sarah completed her B.S. in Materials Science with a geology minor at the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire. She has previous research experience investigating the mechanical properties of superconducting materials.

 

Savannah Ullrich
PhD Student

Email: sullrich@mymail.mines.edu

Savannah is a CoorsTek Fellow and pursuing her PhD in the Materials Science program. She is working with the Naval Research Laboratory to determine the thermal stability and hardness of transparent nanocrystalline magnesium aluminate spinel. In December 2016, she graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from the University of Arkansas. She then performed product testing within the Chemistry Department at Underwriters Laboratories prior to joining the Mines community. She has past research experience in nanomaterial synthesis.

Undergraduate Students

Desmond Mills
Undergraduate Student

Email: desmondmills@mymail.mines.edu

Desmond is an undergraduate research student currently working on his Bachelor’s of Science in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering. His research focus is on scalable methods of producing cost effective III-V high efficiency photovoltaics by reducing substrate cost. By analyzing the morphology of fracture surfaces in (100) Ge and attempting to reduce the roughness of the material, methods of introducing spalling release layers to overcome faceting in (100) GaAs is being explored and developed in his research. This method allows for substrate reuse granting multiple growths of multijunction layers for a single substrate layer. A cost effective III-V device may then have significant competition in terrestrial solar markets providing 40% to 50% efficient solar cells to the residential and commercial solar markets. Desmond is participating in a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) in the summer of 2020 at Brown University researching stress analysis of thin film devices and aims to pursue a PhD in Materials Science focused on the efficiency and epitaxy processes of producing photovoltaic devices..

Majid Mohammad
Undergraduate Student

Email: mmohammad@mymail.mines.edu

Majid is an undergraduate at Mines working on his five year bachelors/masters program in Physics Engineering and Material Science respectively. He has interests in exploring the role additive manufacturing has in developing materials currently and in the future. Majid has recently conducted research on dielectric elastomer generators at the Keplinger Research Group at CU Boulder. In the summer on 2020 he will be attending Princeton for an undergraduate research position in their Astrophysics department. Majid hopes to use his various experiences in research to pursue a career within academia.